2009 CWE/SANS Top 25 Most Dangerous Programming Errors

by: Jerry Liao

Everytime I attend press conferences of I.T. security providers, almost always the report is that threats are going up, and losses are rising in tremendous pace. Should we blame this unfortunate situation to security firms? Partly yes, partly no. Yes because they seem to be playing catch up to attackers, no because software companies are to blame as well.

More often than not, attackers take advantage of software product vulnerabilities and launch their attacks from there. That is why it’s a welcome change for me to hear companies like Microsoft, Oracle, Red Hat, RSA, CERT and other companies and organization coming together to determine the top 25 programming errors.

The 2009 CWE/SANS Top 25 Most Dangerous Programming Errors is a list of the most significant programming errors that can lead to serious software vulnerabilities. They occur frequently, are often easy to find, and easy to exploit. They are dangerous because they will frequently allow attackers to completely take over the software, steal data, or prevent the software from working at all.

The main goal for the Top 25 list is to stop vulnerabilities at the source by educating programmers on how to eliminate all-too-common mistakes before software is even shipped. The list will be a tool for education and awareness that will help programmers to prevent the kinds of vulnerabilities that plague the software industry. Software consumers could use the same list to help them to ask for more secure software. Finally, software managers and CIOs can use the Top 25 list as a measuring stick of progress in their efforts to secure their software.

The Top 25 is organized into three high-level categories that contain multiple CWE entries.

Insecure Interaction Between Components
These weaknesses are related to insecure ways in which data is sent and received between separate components, modules, programs, processes, threads, or systems.
CWE-20: Improper Input Validation
CWE-116: Improper Encoding or Escaping of Output
CWE-89: Failure to Preserve SQL Query Structure (aka ‘SQL Injection’)
CWE-79: Failure to Preserve Web Page Structure (aka ‘Cross-site Scripting’)
CWE-78: Failure to Preserve OS Command Structure (aka ‘OS Command Injection’)
CWE-319: Cleartext Transmission of Sensitive Information
CWE-352: Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF)
CWE-362: Race Condition
CWE-209: Error Message Information Leak

Risky Resource Management
The weaknesses in this category are related to ways in which software does not properly manage the creation, usage, transfer, or destruction of important system resources.
CWE-119: Failure to Constrain Operations within the Bounds of a Memory Buffer
CWE-642: External Control of Critical State Data
CWE-73: External Control of File Name or Path
CWE-426: Untrusted Search Path
CWE-94: Failure to Control Generation of Code (aka ‘Code Injection’)
CWE-494: Download of Code Without Integrity Check
CWE-404: Improper Resource Shutdown or Release
CWE-665: Improper Initialization
CWE-682: Incorrect Calculation

Porous Defenses
The weaknesses in this category are related to defensive techniques that are often misused, abused, or just plain ignored.
CWE-285: Improper Access Control (Authorization)
CWE-327: Use of a Broken or Risky Cryptographic Algorithm
CWE-259: Hard-Coded Password
CWE-732: Insecure Permission Assignment for Critical Resource
CWE-330: Use of Insufficiently Random Values
CWE-250: Execution with Unnecessary Privileges
CWE-602: Client-Side Enforcement of Server-Side Security

Approximately 40 software security experts provided feedback, including software developers, scanning tool vendors, security consultants, government representatives, and university professors.

I do hope now that they have determined the top programming errors, software companies will be able to produce products with less vulnerabilities. If not, the cycle will just be repeated and the consumers will be at the losing end again.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: